Category Archives: RFID

Remotely Controlling Radio Transmitted Soldiers

US military creating Manchurian candidates

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Some Citizens are Embracing the Age of Big Brother

Let’s get microchipped and party!

“We are in a process of developing a whole series of techniques which will enable the controlling oligarchy to get people actually to love their servitude.” – Aldous Huxley

Verimed Health Link, Human Implantable RFID Commercial

RFID Chipping Humans

RFID MICROCHIP TV ADVERT

See:
RFID to Create a Cashless Society
Verichip Granted License to Patent Implantable Virus Detection Systems in Humans

DARPA Funding Swine Flu Vaccine Study

At Duke, Students With Swine Flu Get Cash

DARPA-Funded Study to Detect Infections Before Symptoms Appear

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the research arm of the U.S. Department of Defense, has awarded Duke University $19.5 million for an effort led by the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy (IGSP) to design a portable, easy-to-use diagnostic device that can reveal who is infected with an upper respiratory virus before the first cough or sneeze.

DARPA is interested in such a device because it could offer military commanders in the field valuable information about which soldiers are likely to become sick and potentially unfit for duty.

The project, under the direction of Geoffrey Ginsburg, M.D., Ph.D., director of the IGSP’s Center for Genomic Medicine, is being conducted by a broad and experienced team of investigators including Christopher Woods, M.D., MPH; and Aimee Zaas, M.D., MPH, from Duke’s Division of Infectious Disease; Lawrence Carin, Ph.D, from Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering; and Alfred Hero, Ph.D, from the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering.

Using advanced genomic and statistical tools, investigators have already made considerable progress. In the first phase of the project, researchers discovered a genomic “signature” of infection – a set of changes in gene expression that occurred in people who became symptomatic after exposure to a rhinovirus, the influenza A virus, or the respiratory syncytial virus. They found that in some cases, those changes became apparent hours or even days before symptoms arose.

Biomedical engineers in Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering have already designed a prototype of the device that can “read” the genomic signatures of infection. Over the next two years, in the second phase of the study, researchers will refine the probe and further validate the genomic signature of infections by additional pathogens, including the seasonal H1N1 virus.

Some of those studies will include human viral challenge studies already underway at Retroscreen Virology, Ltd., in London, U.K. Other viral challenge studies are contemplated later in the program in the United States.

One aspect of the research focuses on the natural history of viral infections among college students living in close quarters. This fall, investigators are enrolling Duke students in freshman dormitories in a study of the onset and spread of upper respiratory infections, including influenza. Participants will use a special website to file daily reports about their health and provide blood and other specimens as needed. Investigators hope to enroll from 500 to 800 students and follow them for the entire academic year.

“We expect to gather valuable data about the novel H1N1 virus from these studies,” says Ginsburg. “Presymptomatic detection of a cold or flu would be a significant advance in maintaining the health of our troops and will certainly be a breakthrough for the public’s health and well being, as well.”

Collaborators in the project include researchers at the University of Wisconsin, the University of Virginia, and the National Center for Genome Resources in New Mexico.

RFID to Create a Cashless Society

IBM RFID Commercial – The Future Market

Pay with a wave of your hand?

An implantable chip could allow you to charge purchases or even start your car. It’d be convenient, to be sure. But would it be too creepy?

It’s a simple concept, really: You inject a miniature radio frequency identifier the size of a grain of rice between your thumb and forefinger and, with a wave of your hand, unlock doors, turn on lights, start your car or pay for your drinks at an ultrachic nightspot.

The problem is, the whole concept is a little geeky for most of us, nauseating for some, Orwellian for a few and even apocalyptic for a smattering of religious fundamentalists.

Forget the science of it — and yes, it does work remarkably well. Forget the convenience of it. Forget that similar identifying technologies, from bar codes to mag stripes, overcame similar obstacles and are now ubiquitous.

Radio frequency ID implants face a hurdle the others did not: ickiness.

“There is sort of an icky quality to implanting something,” says Rome Jette, the vice president for smart cards at Versatile Card Technology, a Downers Grove, Ill., card manufacturer that ships 1.5 billion cards worldwide a year.

How RFID devices work

The RFID technology is un-yucky, however. The implanted tag — a passive RFID device consisting of a miniature antenna and chip containing a 16-digit identification number — is scanned by an RFID reader. Once verified, the number is used to unlock a database file, be it a medical record or payment information. Depending upon the application, a reader may verify tags at a distance of 4 inches up to about 30 feet.

The RFID implant has been around for more than 20 years. In its earliest iteration, it provided a convenient way to keep track of dogs, cats and prized racehorses. Few took note or voiced much concern.

Then, in 2002, Applied Digital Solutions (now Digital Angel) of Delray Beach, Fla., deployed to its foreign distributors a beta version of its patented VeriChip technology for human use. Two years later, the VeriChip became the first subcutaneous RFID chip to receive FDA approval as a Class 2 medical device. Full Story

Note: When you go to the original article you’ll see the featured video: Protect yourself against credit, debit card hackers, a crafty way to scare people into the idea of accepting a chip to avoid the possibility of credit card fraud.

See:

Verichip Granted License to Patent Implantable Virus Detection Systems in Humans
Implanting RFID Chips to Track and Kill
RFID Chips: Toxic Technology Infringes on Privacy, Life

Verichip Granted License to Patent Implantable Virus Detection Systems in Humans

VeriChip shares jump after H1N1 patent license win

Shares of VeriChip Corp (CHIP.O) tripled after the company said it had been granted an exclusive license to two patents, which will help it to develop implantable virus detection systems in humans.

The patents, held by VeriChip partner Receptors LLC, relate to biosensors that can detect the H1N1 and other viruses, and biological threats such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, VeriChip said in a statement.

The technology will combine with VeriChip’s implantable radio frequency identification devices to develop virus triage detection systems.

The triage system will provide multiple levels of identification — the first will identify the agent as virus or non-virus, the second level will classify the virus and alert the user to the presence of pandemic threat viruses and the third level will identify the precise pathogen, VeriChip said in a white paper published May 7, 2009.

Shares of VeriChip were up 186 percent at $3.28 Monday late afternoon trade on Nasdaq. They had touched a year high of $3.43 earlier in the session.

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RFID VeriChip Story with Katherine Albrecht

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Related Story:

Novartis chip to help ensure bitter pills are swallowed

Patients who fail to pop pills on time could soon benefit from having a chip on their shoulder, under a ground-breaking electronic system being developed by Novartis, the Swiss pharmaceuticals group.

The company is testing technology that inserts a tiny microchip into each pill swallowed and sends a reminder to patients by text message if they fail to follow their doctors’ prescriptions. Read More

Implanting RFID Chips to Track and Kill

verichip

Cyanide Equipped RFID Chip

Saudi ‘Killer Chip’ Implant Would Track, Eliminate Undesirables

It could be the ultimate in political control — but it won’t be patented in Germany.

German media outlets reported last week that a Saudi inventor’s application to patent a “killer chip,” as the Swiss tabloids put it, had been denied.

The basic model would consist of a tiny GPS transceiver placed in a capsule and inserted under a person’s skin, so that authorities could track him easily.

Model B would have an extra function — a dose of cyanide to remotely kill the wearer without muss or fuss if authorities deemed he’d become a public threat.

The inventor said the chip could be used to track terrorists, criminals, fugitives, illegal immigrants, political dissidents, domestic servants and foreigners overstaying their visas.

“The invention will probably be found to violate paragraph two of the German Patent Law — which does not allow inventions that transgress public order or good morals,” German Patent and Trademark Office spokeswoman Stephanie Krüger told the English-language German-news Web site The Local.

Saudi files for ‘killer’ tracking chip patent

A Saudi Arabian inventor has filed for a patent on a potentially lethal science fiction-style human tracking microchip, the German Patent and Trademark Office (DPMA) told The Local on Friday.

But the macabre innovation that enables remote killing will likely be denied copyright protection.

“While the application is still pending further paperwork on his part, the invention will probably be found to violate paragraph two of the German Patent Law – which does not allow inventions that transgress public order or good morals,” spokeswoman Stephanie Krüger told The Local from Munich.

The patent application – entitled “Implantation of electronic chips in the human body for the purposes of determining its geographical location” – was filed on October 30, 2007, but was only published until last week, or 18 months after submission as required by German law, she said.

“In recent times the number of people sought by security forces has increased,” the Jeddah-based inventor wrote in his summary.

The tiny electronic device, dubbed the “Killer Chip” by Swiss daily Tagesanzeiger, would be suited for tracking fugitives from justice, terrorists, illegal immigrants, criminals, political opponents, defectors, domestic help, and Saudi Arabians who don’t return home from pilgrimages.

“I apply for these reasons and for reasons of state security and the security of citizens,” the statement reads.

After subcutaneous implantation, the chip would send out encrypted radio waves that would be tracked by satellites to confirm the person’s identity and whereabouts. An alternate model chip could reportedly release a poison into the carrier if he or she became a security risk.

“Foreigners are allowed to apply for patents in Germany through a native representative, in this case it was a Munich law firm,” Krüger told The Local. “Most people apply for a patent in several countries, and this inventor probably did too.”

But the law firm, DTS Munich, is no longer responsible for the application.

“We resigned from representation of this case last week,” a spokesman said without stating why.

See: RFID Chips: Toxic Technology Infringes on Privacy, Life