Tag Archives: swine flu

Desiree Jennings: Lying Dr. Adding Insult to (Vaccine) Injury

Media Disinfo Disabled Cheerleader Called Mentally ill

The doctor in the video says there are no reported cases of dystonia from the flu vaccine. However, the VAERS Request (The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System) from the CDC website shows there have been four cases of dystonia as a result of the seasonal influenza vaccine. When querying on the influenza vaccine flu mist, it brings the total to five cases.

Screen Shots from the CDC:
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Swine Flu Cases Overestimated, Yet Obama Declares Nat’l Emergency

H1N1 Cases Overestimated?

In a months long CBS News investigation, state-by-state results of tests for H1N1 found that most cases were negative. The Wall Street Journal’s Alicia Mundy and Politico’s Fred Barbash spoke with Sharyl Attkisson about these startling findings.

H1N1 flu declared a national emergency

Obama Declares H1N1 Flu ‘National Emergency’

President Obama signed a proclamation declaring the H1N1 influenza a national emergency, giving doctors and medical facilities greater leeway in responding to the flu pandemic.

Obama signed the declaration late Friday, which the White House said allows medical treatment facilities to better handle a surge in flu patients by waiving federal requirements on a case-by-case basis.

“The foundation of our national approach to the H1N1 flu has been preparedness at all levels — personal, business, and government — and this proclamation helps that effort by advancing our overall response capability,” the White House said in a statement.

The flu has infected millions of Americans and killed nearly 100 children in the U.S. The chief of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that over a thousand people have died as a result, with 46 states reporting widespread H1N1 activity.

“Since the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve seen more than 1,000 deaths and 20,000 hospitalizations,” said Dr. Thomas Frieden, head of the CDC. “We expect it to occur in waves, but we can’t predict when those waves will happen.”

Sixty million Americans have been vaccinated against the seasonal flu this year, but an additional vaccine against H1N1 has been in short supply. About 120 million doses were expected to be made available by the middle of October, though only 11 million doses have been shipped to health departments for use.

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Most H1N1 fatalities had pre-existing conditions

Most of the people who have died from the new pandemic H1N1 flu had underlying conditions such as asthma, but 45 per cent seemed healthy, according to the largest study yet of US cases.

Children with sickle cell and other blood diseases have a special risk from the swine flu, just as they do from seasonal influenza, Dr. Anne Schuchat of the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention said yesterday.

She said hypodermic versions of the flu vaccine — suitable for babies, people with asthma and people 50 and older — will be available this week.

Schuchat said the CDC collected detailed data on 1,400 adults and 500 children hospitalised with swine flu in 10 states. The findings confirm that most serious cases and deaths have been in people under the age of 65. Full Story

See:

Martial Law and the Militarization of Public Health: The Worldwide H1N1 Flu Vaccination Program

Government Invested 7-8 Billion Dollars in Swine Flu Vaccine Program

Swine flu shot – lives endangered?

While Congress debates the pros and cons of healthcare reform, the average U.S. citizen is facing a more urgent dilemma – to get a swine flu shot, or not?

When it comes to gambling on health, some people opt for ‘thanks, but no thanks’.

RT’s Priya Sridhar talks about the heated debate on vaccine safety with Barbara Loe Fisher, President of National vaccine information centre.

Lawsuit to Stop Swine Flu Vaccine Campaign

Lawsuit seeks to halt US swine flu vaccination campaign

New York medical staff took legal action Thursday to halt a massive swine flu inoculation program being rolled out across the United States, claiming the vaccines have not been properly tested.

Lawyers for the group filed a temporary restraining order in a Washington federal court against government medical regulators they claim rushed H1N1 vaccines to the public without adequately testing their safety and efficacy.

“None of the vaccines against H1N1 have been properly tested,” attorney Jim Turner, one of half a dozen lawyers working on the case, told AFP.

The suit was brought on behalf of a group of doctors, nurses and other medical personnel in New York, where health care professionals who see patients are required to be vaccinated against H1N1, Turner said.

If the complaint is upheld, it would stop the roll-out of the H1N1 vaccine nationwide, said Turner, who accused public health officials of hyping the swine flu outbreak but failing to back up their stance with adequate testing of the vaccine.

“Officials have said the virus is so much like the ordinary flu virus that they don’t need to do special new drug testing on it because it’s just the same old virus with a minor change to it,” said Turner.

“We’re saying, if that’s the case, then all the hype about this thing being a worldwide threat is misplaced and they’ve stampeded the state of New York into taking an action they never would have taken if it were just another flu.”

Last week, some 2.4 million doses of nasal spray vaccine made of greatly weakened, but live, H1N1 virus were delivered to state and local health authorities around the United States.

This week, even larger stocks of injectable vaccine were delivered and administered to people in groups deemed to be at particular risk from swine flu, including children and health care professionals.

US public health officials want to vaccinate tens of millions of Americans by year’s end against swine flu, which has claimed more than 4,500 lives worldwide since an outbreak of H1N1 was first reported in Mexico in April.

Related Story: Vaccine Trials Require 13 Months of Evaluation for Safety

Profiting from Deadly H1N1 Vaccine

How they will Profit from H1N1

Drugmakers, Doctors Rake in Billions Battling H1N1 Flu

Americans are still debating whether to roll up their sleeves for a swine flu shot, but companies have already figured it out: vaccines are good for business.

Drug companies have sold $1.5 billion worth of swine flu shots, in addition to the $1 billion for seasonal flu they booked earlier this year. These inoculations are part of a much wider and rapidly growing $20 billion global vaccine market.

“The vaccine market is booming,” says Bruce Carlson, spokesperson at market research firm Kalorama, which publishes an annual survey of the vaccine industry. “It’s an enormous growth area for pharmaceuticals at a time when other areas are not doing so well,” he says, noting that the pipeline for more traditional blockbuster drugs such as Lipitor and Nexium has thinned.

As always with pandemic flus, taxpayers are footing the $1.5 billion check for the 250 million swine flu vaccines that the government has ordered so far and will be distributing free to doctors, pharmacies and schools. In addition, Congress has set aside more than $10 billion this year to research flu viruses, monitor H1N1’s progress and educate the public about prevention.

Drugmakers pocket most of the revenues from flu sales, with Sanofi-Pasteur, Glaxo Smith Kline and Novartis cornering most of the market.

But some say it’s not just drugmakers who stand to benefit. Doctors collect copayments for special office visits to inject shots, and there have been assertions that these doctors actually profit handsomely from these vaccinations. Full Story

Doctor Admits Vaccine Is More Deadly Than Swine Flu Itself & Will Not Give It To His Kids

See: New Swine Flu Vaccine Deadly

Flu Vaccine Cripples Woman for Life

Woman Disabled by THIS YEARS FLU SHOT (10 days AFTER vaccination )

See:

Update on Woman Crippled for Life by Flu Vaccine
Desiree Jennings: Adding Insult to (Vaccine) Injury With Update

DARPA Funding Swine Flu Vaccine Study

At Duke, Students With Swine Flu Get Cash

DARPA-Funded Study to Detect Infections Before Symptoms Appear

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the research arm of the U.S. Department of Defense, has awarded Duke University $19.5 million for an effort led by the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy (IGSP) to design a portable, easy-to-use diagnostic device that can reveal who is infected with an upper respiratory virus before the first cough or sneeze.

DARPA is interested in such a device because it could offer military commanders in the field valuable information about which soldiers are likely to become sick and potentially unfit for duty.

The project, under the direction of Geoffrey Ginsburg, M.D., Ph.D., director of the IGSP’s Center for Genomic Medicine, is being conducted by a broad and experienced team of investigators including Christopher Woods, M.D., MPH; and Aimee Zaas, M.D., MPH, from Duke’s Division of Infectious Disease; Lawrence Carin, Ph.D, from Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering; and Alfred Hero, Ph.D, from the University of Michigan’s College of Engineering.

Using advanced genomic and statistical tools, investigators have already made considerable progress. In the first phase of the project, researchers discovered a genomic “signature” of infection – a set of changes in gene expression that occurred in people who became symptomatic after exposure to a rhinovirus, the influenza A virus, or the respiratory syncytial virus. They found that in some cases, those changes became apparent hours or even days before symptoms arose.

Biomedical engineers in Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering have already designed a prototype of the device that can “read” the genomic signatures of infection. Over the next two years, in the second phase of the study, researchers will refine the probe and further validate the genomic signature of infections by additional pathogens, including the seasonal H1N1 virus.

Some of those studies will include human viral challenge studies already underway at Retroscreen Virology, Ltd., in London, U.K. Other viral challenge studies are contemplated later in the program in the United States.

One aspect of the research focuses on the natural history of viral infections among college students living in close quarters. This fall, investigators are enrolling Duke students in freshman dormitories in a study of the onset and spread of upper respiratory infections, including influenza. Participants will use a special website to file daily reports about their health and provide blood and other specimens as needed. Investigators hope to enroll from 500 to 800 students and follow them for the entire academic year.

“We expect to gather valuable data about the novel H1N1 virus from these studies,” says Ginsburg. “Presymptomatic detection of a cold or flu would be a significant advance in maintaining the health of our troops and will certainly be a breakthrough for the public’s health and well being, as well.”

Collaborators in the project include researchers at the University of Wisconsin, the University of Virginia, and the National Center for Genome Resources in New Mexico.